7 Experts: Unmasking The Science You Aren’t Hearing On TV | COVID-19 Facts from the Frontline

Introducing the “Facts From the Frontlines episode of TheTonyRobbinsPodcast – where Tony uncovers the truth about coronavirus with a 7-person panel of highly qualified researchers, an experienced epidemiologist, a Nobel Laureate, and M.D.s testing and treating patients on the frontlines. Together, they reveal the evidence-based research that has come to light so far.

Video Transcript

00:00
(somber music)
00:07
– This may be one of the more
00:08
important podcasts we’ve done.
00:12
We all know we’re living in extraordinarily intense times,
00:14
the most intense most of us have experienced,
00:16
at least in our adult lives.
00:18
The challenge that we’re experiencing today
00:20
are as intense as we’ve ever seen,
00:23
and the challenge is not only people are dying,
00:25
but people are dying alone.
00:28
Families can’t visit with their family members
00:30
because of understanding of the virus
00:32
and our concerns about how it could spread.
00:36
And we’re living in a world where,
00:37
quite frankly, we’ve made decisions
00:39
that are also affecting
00:40
not just the people that have already passed away
00:44
but also are gonna affect people in the future,
00:46
and also the ways we’ve responded to this virus
00:49
are having gigantic effects around the world.
00:53
There are people all over the world
00:55
that are having all kinds of challenges.
00:57
90% of brain surgeries haven’t happened.
00:59
I could go through a whole list,
01:00
but the feeding problem
01:01
is one of the things I’m most concerned about,
01:03
and people moving into poverty,
01:05
which leads to deaths as well.
01:09
The World Food Organization that the UN sponsors is saying
01:11
maybe 265 million people might go hungry this year,
01:15
almost double what normally happens.
01:19
I wanted today to see if we could go on
01:22
kind of an exploration, if you will,
01:24
a journey, not a trip.
01:25
A trip’s predictable.
01:27
A journey you might be surprised.
01:29
And I’ve been on a journey
01:30
because I care so much and I know you do too.
01:32
What does this mean?
01:33
I have my own parents
01:35
that are my mother and father in law,
01:37
but they’re in their 70s.
01:38
I adore them and obviously extreme concern,
01:40
so I started to immerse myself
01:42
in every detail I could find on the science of this.
01:45
And as I did,
01:46
I came across a set of doctors, Nobel Prize winners,
01:51
professors of epidemiology,
01:52
some of the most qualified people in the world
01:54
that we’re bringing up new facts that we have today
01:56
that are very different than we made the decisions
01:58
to shut down the world economy.
02:01
Science is about
02:02
as new facts come forward make new decisions,
02:04
but sometimes the momentum
02:06
of the story and the fear takes us over.
02:14
– I think cases become a big issue for clinical reasons.
02:18
Unfortunately, there’s a huge amount of politics
02:21
in all of this everywhere.
02:23
I think that, unfortunately, science is difficult
02:26
and you can’t make promises,
02:28
and I think that there was a dynamic here
02:32
and a dynamic which I found very anti-scientific
02:37
that lead to decisions being made.
02:39
The World Health Organization has a record of exaggerating
02:42
and I think they do this deliberately
02:43
because they fear that the public won’t pay attention.
02:46
The total number of excess deaths
02:49
reported by a website called EuroMOMO
02:51
up till today is 160,000, maybe 170,000.
02:57
Basically that’s about the same number of people
02:59
who died in an excess way
03:01
in the flu season of 2017, ’18.
03:05
So basically my guess is it’s going to be
03:07
maybe one and a half times more excess deaths.
03:10
Excess deaths are very important
03:12
because if I’m very sick
03:15
and then I’m laid with a corona death
03:17
that’s fine, except I won’t die again next month.
03:21
So basically if you look at the total deaths
03:23
each person is only counted once,
03:25
whereas if you assume that everyone who dies of corona
03:28
is extra, you’re overcounting.
03:30
– One of the challenges is that when people were looking
03:33
at all the numbers that were coming out of the TV
03:35
and they were doing the death rate,
03:37
the case fatality rates,
03:39
they were looking really,
03:40
and this is, I’ll call it
03:42
a rookie 101 mistake in epidemiology,
03:45
in that you don’t take the incident rate
03:47
to figure out the case fatality,
03:48
you look at the prevalence.
03:50
And it was stunning to me that all the media
03:52
would put on these so called experts
03:55
and not raise this issue
03:57
as to why the case fatality rate
04:00
is just completely and absolutely overstated.
04:04
Yes, we as citizens need to be responsible
04:07
and we need to think about what we do
04:10
and how it impacts those around us,
04:12
but we shouldn’t be so fearful
04:14
that we decide to live in a bubble
04:17
and hermetically seal our home
04:18
in hopes that we never get anymore diseases ever again.
04:21
That’s just nonsense.
04:22
– I would submit that we’re pivoting towards a time now
04:25
where we have to ask ourselves questions
04:27
about who are we, what is our country,
04:31
are we losing personal liberties,
04:33
if we’re going to use contact tracing,
04:35
what does that look like?
04:36
Does that look like voluntary use of our form
04:39
or is it gonna be involuntary?
04:42
Are there gonna be drones that swoop and watch us?
04:46
We need to be very careful
04:47
because in the end, when we’re all said and done,
04:49
we’re looking at a respiratory virus,
04:52
a single-stranded RNA virus.
04:54
We’ve dealt with these before.
04:56
And we know that 40 to 50% of people who get it
04:59
may not even know they had it.
05:00
We know another 40, 50% that get it
05:03
will skate through it.
05:04
We know that we’re probably gonna,
05:05
at the end of the day, end up somewhere
05:07
between one out of 1,000 patients dying from it.
05:11
– It’s interesting because when I was
05:12
doing the research originally,
05:13
I remember in late February
05:15
I was watching everyday because I’m concerned
05:17
that the death rate shot up 600% in one day,
05:20
and I’m no epidemiologist, but that didn’t make any sense,
05:23
I’m talking about the world death rate.
05:24
And then I dug in and finally found the labs
05:26
that said they could change the diagnostic procedure
05:29
to no longer having to do a test
05:32
since as late as February,
05:33
and that’s why the number of deaths shot through the roof
05:35
because anything they suspected as COVID,
05:38
they listed as COVID.
05:39
And then a few weeks ago, as I know you know,
05:40
the CDC made it formal in the US
05:43
that you don’t need to do a test,
05:44
just if you suspect it.
05:46
But there’s actually even, as I understand from you,
05:48
economic incentives by the hospitals
05:51
’cause some have been reclassified
05:52
as COVID-19 deaths after the fact,
05:55
and what is that financial incentive they’ll share with us?
05:58
– We were basically being advised as physicians
06:00
as to how to correctly complete a death certificate
06:03
if COVID-19 was involved directly
06:06
or perhaps even presumptively or probably
06:09
or peripherally involved.
06:10
I was coached and massaged to utilize COVID-19
06:14
as a factor in the causation of death
06:16
even if I hadn’t checked a COVID-19 test,
06:19
even if I hadn’t had an interest in one.
06:22
And right around that time,
06:23
Dr. Burks from Washington, D.C. was saying
06:26
that nobody’s going to die with COVID-19,
06:28
if they have it, they’re dying of it.
06:30
And that was about a silly a thing as I have heard
06:32
because if a person gets hit by a bus
06:35
and over the first two hours
06:36
of examination in an emergency room
06:39
we learn that both of their lungs are collapsed
06:41
but also some baseline laboratory works
06:45
addressed the fact that there was a low hemoglobin
06:47
but also a COVID-19 test happened to be positive
06:50
in the PCR form of it,
06:52
it would be absolutely ridiculous to put down COVID-19.
06:55
On the one hand, part of my life
06:56
is in the trenches practice and primary care
06:59
and then I come down to the capital
07:00
where I see this partisan battle for power.
07:04
And the best way to power
07:06
sometimes is to keep people frightened
07:08
and then tell ’em who to blame,
07:10
and after you’ve done enough of that
07:11
then sort of step up and raise your hand and say
07:14
but follow me, I’ll take care of you.
07:16
That’s sort of a typical formula in the world of politics.
07:19
And I think sometimes when these things happen,
07:21
we don’t recognize them at the time,
07:22
it’s when we look at them through the retrospectiscope,
07:25
so I really think the crisis is pivoting.
07:28
– If you look at the case fatality rate,
07:30
the number of people who die who get it,
07:33
it’s over 3% when you get to 70 and over.
07:37
That’s a real risk.
07:39
– [Tony] Yes.
07:40
– Look at 60 and under, it’s less than 2/10 of 1%,
07:45
or about less than twice the flu,
07:48
but really what you need to do
07:50
is protect people who are over the age of 70.
07:53
Protect them from the risk they would have
07:56
if they were exposed to the virus
07:58
’cause they’re in that 3 to 5% death rate
08:01
from getting the disease.
08:04
On the other hand, most of the economy
08:07
is driven by younger people, 95 to 97%,
08:12
and they don’t need to be protected.
08:15
We made that mistake early on
08:17
in looking at the data from China
08:20
and we will probably come back and regret it,
08:23
but you could really open up the whole economy
08:26
and not have much increase in the risk.
08:30
The problem is without the economy open,
08:33
we’re having more deaths of despair
08:36
than we are deaths from the COVID virus.
08:39
– Now what we’re seeing is the collateral damage of COVID
08:42
is way outweighing the disease itself.
08:45
I can tell you about suicide cases personally,
08:47
23-year-old.
08:48
I can tell you about anxiety, depression, alcoholism,
08:51
all in my community that are sky-rocketing now
08:53
because of COVID.
08:54
So I think the conversation has to switch now
08:57
to how do we get the economy going again
08:59
because the collateral damage of the economy shutdown
09:04
is becoming far worse than the virus itself.
09:07
– We took a Hippocratic Oath to do no harm
09:10
and to tell the truth
09:13
and we looked at our numbers and we had
09:16
some of Stanford’s preliminary data was out.
09:20
We were looking at these different studies
09:21
and we’re saying
09:23
the epidemiology of this disease is similar to flu.
09:28
And have we ever shut down for flu before?
09:30
We haven’t.
09:32
Does it make sense to shut down the economy,
09:35
to have folks not have work,
09:38
not be able to support their families?
09:42
Influenza is a very dangerous disease.
09:44
I’ve had folks in their 30s and 40s die from influenza
09:47
when I used to work in the ER,
09:49
so as Dr. Erickson said influenza is very serious,
09:51
but we are familiar with influenza,
09:54
so we say it’s just a flu.
09:55
So whenever you have something
09:57
that you’re unfamiliar with, you have lots of fear,
10:00
and then trying to change people’s narrative,
10:04
their mindset,
10:05
with new data is very, very difficult
10:08
because they have that old mindset.
10:10
– I’m an infectious disease physician,
10:12
and my sort of understanding,
10:16
and not also disease modeling,
10:18
my understanding is a disease like this
10:21
spreads quite widely
10:23
and so the numbers didn’t quite add up.
10:26
So that’s why we put that study together.
10:32
And we sampled a group of well over 3000 people.
10:36
We used a test kit that by now
10:38
has been vetted very carefully
10:41
and we know exactly what it tells us.
10:43
One thing that I was hoping that our study would do
10:45
is reduce that uncertainty.
10:47
We were living with such an enormous amount of uncertainty
10:49
and I think that uncertainty
10:50
was really getting people worked up.
10:53
And like many here,
10:56
I wish this were not a political issue,
10:58
I wish this were an area where we could come together
11:01
and say okay we need to count all false deaths
11:03
because the coding is not something that is reliable.
11:07
We need to understand the issue about immunity.
11:10
We need to understand the issue
11:11
about the age distribution
11:13
and the differences across ages.
11:16
And these are some of the very key priorities
11:18
that will help us really learn how to deal with it.
11:21
We have to start wrapping our head around
11:24
making decisions in a more informed way.
11:28
– The whole purpose of this is to honor those
11:31
that have already put their lives on the line for us,
11:34
so many doctors and nurses.
11:36
I cry just thinking about it.
11:37
So many police officers, first responders,
11:40
people driving trucks so that we can
11:42
still have our livelihood and our life
11:43
and be with our families that get taken for granted.
11:46
I know most of you don’t take them for granted,
11:47
but I hope in the midst of this
11:49
we don’t lose track of all that they’ve done for us.
11:53
Please remember we human beings are pretty damn resilient.
11:58
We’ve been around 200,000 years.
12:00
We’ve experienced every kind of change in the environment,
12:03
every kind of microbe,
12:04
every kind of challenge you could imagine,
12:06
and here we still stand for better or worse,
12:08
hopefully for better.
12:10
And just remember life is meant to be lived.
12:14
And sometimes we can get overcome
12:16
by the drama by what we see and hear every moment
12:19
and by dealing with real challenges that we forget
12:22
that this life is still meant to be lived.
12:24
So whether it be winter, spring, summer, fall,
12:26
whether it be in tough times or good times,
12:28
I hope you’ll find gratitude and joy and love
12:31
with the people that you love
12:32
and you’ll continue to grow and continue to expand.
12:34
So no matter what happens economically,
12:36
what happens in the environment,
12:38
there’s a quality of life
12:39
waiting to be lived and enjoyed by you
12:40
by just finding things to be grateful for
12:43
in the midst of challenge.
12:44
That’s I think how we stay resilient,
12:46
that’s how we keep moving the ball forward,
12:48
that’s how we serve our children,
12:49
our family, and our friends.
12:50
So live fully, live with passion,
12:54
and hopefully until we meet again, God bless.
12:57
(soft tender music)